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At the heart of English folk
Rosie Hood

BBC Performing Arts Fellowship recipient announced

Traditional singer Rosie Hood has been awarded a BBC Performing Arts Fellowship to work with the English Folk Dance and Song Society.

Under the scheme, EFDSS will work with Rosie during 2015 to develop her artistic skills and professional opportunities, offering her guidance in a number of areas.

Rosie, who performs solo and with The Dovetail Trio, will also have access to rehearsal and performance opportunities and be part of EFDSS' showcasing programme both in the UK and abroad.

The fellowship is awarded by the BBC Performing Arts Fund, which has given a total of £32,000 to 32 arts organisations across the UK so they can host a bespoke placement opportunity as part of the scheme.

Successful organisations were able to demonstrate that a Fellowship placement with them would offer significant professional development opportunities for a Fellow, that their placement would be realistic and achievable, and that the selection process they went through to identify the Fellow was fair and transparent.

It is the second time in three years that a folk musician has received a Fellowship – singer songwriter Maz O’Connor was the recipient of an award in 2013.

 

"EFDSS is very excited to be part of the BBC Performing Arts Fund Fellowships and be working with Rosie over the next 12 months.

"She is a highly talented young artist at a stage in her career when this support can really help her to develop both her creative and business skills."

Katy Spicer, EFDSS Chief Executive

 

"I'm completely thrilled to have been awarded a Performing Arts Fund Fellowship with EFDSS.

"The combined knowledge, expertise and contacts of the society will be an invaluable resource to me over the coming year and I already feel more confident in my goals knowing that EFDSS believe in my ability to achieve them.

"The potential of what I might accomplish in this Fellowship is incredibly exciting and just a little bit daunting! I can't wait to throw myself into it and develop musically, creatively and professionally in 2015."

Rosie Hood

 

"Thirty-two amazing talents from across the UK will benefit from a year of sustained support from wonderful arts organisations, enabling them to really build on their talent and reach their potential.

“The diversity of the Fellows, from opera to spoken word, theatre to dance, from Northern Ireland to Southampton, shows a real commitment by the BBC Performing Arts Fund to support the sector.”

Miriam O’Keeffe, Director of the BBC Performing Arts Fund

 

About Rosie

Rosie is a young, traditional singer who learnt songs at an early age from her family. She is well known for her strong, pure voice and engaging solo performance.

Rosie has a keen interest in the history of traditional songs, particularly those of her native Wiltshire, where she has spent time researching in the local archives and developing a broad repertoire of local songs.

She was a finalist in the 2011 New Roots competition for young musicians, and won both the open mic competition at the 2011 Shrewsbury Folk Festival and the 2012 Fred Jordan Memorial Award (for traditional singing) at Bromyard Folk Festival.

Rosie released a solo EP in 2011 and has performed at many of the country's leading folk festivals and folk clubs. She currently performs lead vocals in The Dovetail Trio.

About the BBC Performing Arts Fund

The BBC Performing Arts Fund is a registered charity. The charity (formerly Fame Academy Bursary Trust) was set up in 2003 within the BBC. The fund receives revenue from the voting lines of BBC One entertainment programmes that seek to find new performing talent (including The Voice, Fame Academy, How Do you Solve A Problem Like Maria? and Over The Rainbow).

To date the fund has allocated more than £5 million to talented performing arts individuals and community groups, as well as offering mentoring and advice to help them achieve their goals.

 

 

The Full English

The Full English

Unlocking hidden treasure of England’s cultural heritage. The Full English is the world’s largest free digital archive English folk songs, tunes, dances and customs. Containing more than 58,400 items from 12 of the country’s most important early 20th century folk music collections, you can delve into wherever you are in the world.

 

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